spoopycecil:

tiny scientist what the hell is your problem

purepopfornowpeople:

Time is a flat circle.

amomiu:

— the angels revealed themselves to her; said they were ten feet tall, radiant, and one of them was black; said they helped her with various household chores. One of them changed a light bulb for her, the porch light.

After working on this piece on and off for almost a year, I think it’s finally more or less done. It’s so difficult to decide when something is “finished”.

I’m intrigued by the idea of Night Vale angels looking like something one wouldn’t traditionally call an angel. Heads like those of ancient Egyptian gods and bodies like distorted modern sculptures. Tall, ominous and creepy, but happy to help an old lady with simple household chores.

impressionist:

paradelle:

crossedwires:

niqaeli:

I admit, I don’t know Cho that well, so I am glad there are other readings to be had!

And if he is just calling it out simply because he’s tired of it and he feels comfortable doing so even on his own films now, I think that’s fantastic. There’s certainly plenty for him to be calling out.

Heh. Well, I don’t know John Cho either. But he has talked about race & representation before* (and not in a ‘we’re all human, it doesn’t matter’ way), so it’s not completely ‘out of character’ for him to bring it up. I think it probably would be easier on him if he didn’t say anything, but I’m glad he does.

*Re Harold & Kumar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHEkLBZI1IM 4:07 mark): If you have a Korean and an Indian guy as your leads, you must address race at some point in the movie. You must, because the audience is noting it, really. The other thing is, I think, comedy at its best, treads in taboo waters a little bit. It has to have that transgressive quality to it, and race is the biggest taboo in America. I mean, people are very reluctant to talk about race and yet when you do jokes about race, uh, that work, people are very happy to release tension and laugh about it. But it has been interesting. I’ll make an observation. During the first tour for the first movie, we were talking about race all the time with journalists. It was almost like a process— looking back, the first movie was more concerned with race, but we talked about it so much, I felt that it was in a way…a way of justifying our presence in a motion picture.

And from an interview in 2009 http://www.asiaarts.ucla.edu/090703/article.asp?parentID=110145&gt:

JC: I recall from the Harold and Kumar movies is my struggle with the advertisers.

APA: What happened there?

JC: There was all this racial humor in the movie, and the advertising department wanted to say “Starring the Asian guy in American Pie, and the Indian guy from Van Wilder…” and they did go with that, and they submitted that to me for approval, and I said, “I don’t like it.” They asked me why, and I explain it to them, and that was tricky because it’s difficult explaining to my own representatives, why that didn’t jibe with me, because everyone kind of felt like it was keeping in tone with the movie. And I said, “I don’t like it. We’re poking fun at racism in the movie all the time, but it puts the audience on the wrong side of the racism joke.” So they were playing with the wording a little bit in the edits, and they kept coming up with versions to make me happy, but they were essentially the same thing, and I finally said, “you are not going to make me happy. You’re dancing around it, and you’re clearly attached to this idea, and I want you to know that no version of this idea will make me happy. And if you’re afraid that I won’t show up to do promotion because of this bitterness, you can rest assured that that’s not true. I consider promoting a movie part of my duties, and I will show up nevertheless. But you can either use this campaign and know that I’m unhappy, or you can change it and know that I’m happy. That’s it. Stop trying.” And eventually they went with it, and it’s one of those things where I look back and I’ve very proud of the movie, but that’s the thing I remember.

APA: Last question…for Harold and Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay, Viva La Union recorded a song for the soundtrack with the line, “I want my own Chinese baby” — what’s that about?

JC: When I was thinking about it, I thought of a literal baby. There’s a kind of lack that children fill, that’s just the dark side of being a parent, I think. And there’s an accessory quality to Chinese babies in America, and I just think it’s funny. I just liked it. And you know, I would know people who would fawn over Asian babies more, and it got me to thinking, there’s this belief that Asian babies are really cute, and it got me thinking that our whole race is infantilized to some degree, and it manifests itself in different ways. You infantilize a woman, and she becomes eroticized. You infantilize a man, and he becomes emasculated. You infantilize a baby [laughs] — and it’s possible, it appears that you can infantilize a baby even more. [laughs] The babies need to be cuter than white babies. And it’s just a weird thing that I felt like said something about mainstream America’s relationship to Asians in general. So that’s where it came from.

Also this interview: http://blog.angryasianman.com/2008/04/q-with-john-cho.html

“And yes, I do feel a responsibility, and always have, and it’s been an odd burden for me. Even when I started and no one gave a shit, I was trying to avoid doing roles—and it’s no accident that I’ve never done something with a chop suey accent. It’s no accident that I’ve never played those parts. I strongly believe there are a lot of Asian American actors who think that that’s the price to pay before you get to wherever you’re going. And I take real issue with that. Because you have to maintain integrity from the start, and on a personal level, you have to not do something that’s going to make you sick to your stomach.

But on a political level, how are things supposed to ever change if there’s someone willing to do it? I can tell you now, having worked in the business, that you can gather an army of people to hold picket signs and stand outside the studio, and say, “we destest this portrayal”… but it doesn’t matter if there’s a guy—who they know, a peer—who’s willing to do it, who stands in front of the crew and does the buck-tooth accent. If he or she is willing to do it, it makes the protestors look like extremists. It makes this guy look like the normal guy. Because we all work in the same industry. So the willingness of one actor negates a thousand protestors and a thousand angry letters.”

(So I can see why Butawhiteman Cantbekhan playing Khan would be deeply upsetting to him, even if Cho wasn’t in this movie.)

I love him 1000 times just for flawlessly articulating this racist absurdity in the most succinct and accurate way I’ve ever encountered.

john cho my hero

fuquerie:

lorettafryingpan:

A Pacific Rim video set to “Sound The Bells”, by Dessa

Just—just watch it. Don’t ask questions, just press play. You will not be disappointed.

All right, who combined my favorite movie with my favorite female music artist? I need to know so I can propose.

theweniswarmer:

It’s Time

A mix of classic, retro, and different Halloween Songs

  1. This is Halloween - Nightmare Before Christmas Soundtrack
  2. Monster Mash - Selebrities
  3. Day of the Dead - Voltaire
  4. Thriller - Michael Jackson
  5. It’s Terror Time Again - Scooby Doo on Zombie Island
  6. Brains! - Voltaire
  7. Ghost Busters Theme - Ray Parker Jr.
  8. Feed Me (Git it) - Little Shop of Horrors
  9. Grim Grinning Ghosts - Disney’s Haunted Mansion
  10. The Greatest Show Unearthed - Creature Feature
  11. Time Warp - Rocky Horror Picture Show
  12. Oogie Boogie - The Nightmare Before Christmas
  13. Friends on the Other Side - Disney’s The Princess and The Frog
  14. Worst Pies in London - Sweeney Tod
  15. I Put a Spell on You - Hocus Pocus Soundtrack
  16. Dinner with Drac - John “The Cool Ghoul” Zacherle
  17. The Devil Went Down to Georgia - Charlie Daniels Band
  18. Welcome to My Nightmare - Alice Cooper
  19. The Headless Horseman - Disney’s Ichabod & Mr. Toad
  20. Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) - David Bowie
  21. The Addam’s Family Song - The Addam’s Family Soundtrack
  22. Witch Doctor - Peter Pan Records
  23. Grave Robber at Large - Creature Feature
  24. Spooky Scary Skeletons - TheLivingTombstone mix

LISTEN HERE (X)

refined-grace:

"Elmo is with his good friend, Lupita. They are talking about all the great things about their skin. For example, Elmo’s skin just happens to be very ticklish. Lupita’s skin happens to be a beautiful brown color. Skin can come in all different shades and colors. Isn’t skin just the best? However, ticklish or smooth or black or brown or white or tan, be sure to love the skin you are in." 

I love this. I LOVE THIS. I love this. Children need to see this. Adults need to see this.

thismightyart:

The Dark Planet and The Smiling God at they icecream date!!

cosplayingwhileblack:

intergalacticafro:

"Are you sure that’s a real spell?" said the girl. "Well, it’s not very good, is it? I’ve tried a few simple spells just for practice and it’s all worked for me. Nobody in my family’s magic at all, it was ever such a surprise when I got my letter, but I was ever so pleased, of course, I mean, it’s the very best school of witchcraft there is, I’ve heard—I’ve learned all our course books by heart, of course, I just hope it will be enough—I’m Hermione Granger, by the way, who are you?”

having grown up with the HP series, i have said on multiple occasions that i am hermione granger. it’s no coincidence that we’ve never been in the same room, and i too am a magical bossy know-it-all with big hair who’s smart in school.

but now…now it’s OFFICIAL. and here are the pics to prove it~

photos taken/edited by ArtsyRaccoon, it was my first time working with her and she did an AMAZING job and was so sweet, please go check her out ;-;

more photos from this shoot HERE

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